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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. .. only those recognized to speak will be allowed to. >> and those who are not in compliance will be removed from the committee room. i would like to welcome our first panel today. the director of the national intelligence james clapper deputy attorney james cole national security or keith alexander the deputy director of the nsa chris ingalls. following the first panel we will move immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing will provide an open forum to discuss amendments to the surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled at the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how the proposal is under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur and encourage members to answer questio
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening statement and your opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day to get some things clarified for the record. it will be important for the american people. .e do expect a vote we will hold as long as we can. we will take a brief intermission. there are only two votes. we should be able to recess or a short time and return. i will recognize any opening comment. for comingu, panel, here today. hopefully, we will get the facts on the table and let the american people understand what we do and how we do it.
to hear about the tech giants and nsa spying. google says it's outraged. this is "around the world" on cnn. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael homes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers. >> waiting for the white house briefing, they'll respond to the latest nsa spying allegations and expect to comment on the problems with the obama care website. live as soon as it happens. keep a close eye on the white house. >>> we're all familiar with when you get on the plane, shut off your cell phone, turn off the gadgets, anything with a power button, turn it off. it's been that way for years but things are about to change. at least in the u.s. >> yes. federal airline officials made this big announcement today. just a couple of hours ago. looks like the airline's going to have to change the preflight videos. >> clear. insert mobile phones and electronic devices are turned off. if you're -- >> i love that little video there. delta, chris lawrence, reagan national airport. i'm one of the people in the back of the plane on my phone trying to get the last bit in here, if
? >> well, let me say something about the nsa. i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. it begins with the director of national intelligence, it goes to the white house, it's the president, it's the nsc the cabinet and then the framework is formed. now, what happens is, people add to it, state wants this, department of state wants to know this. or somebody else wants to know that. priorities are ranked. as i understand it these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support of our military abroad. three, nuclear counter proliferation. four, hard targets. and now cyber. and those are the main areas. so essentially the nsa is told to do certain things and it does it. what i think we need to do, we work very well with the house committee and leadership, mike rogers and congressman rupersberger is review of the intelligence framework of how all this gets together. what the criteria for inclusi
hill now facing questions about why the nsa is tapping the phones of some of our closest allies. what exactly the president knew about it. will the nsa have to put an end to it? national news, we heard this over and over. if you like your health plan you can keep your health plan. now thousands of americans are finding out that's not true. including our guest, former democratic congressional staffer that has been an enthusiastic proponent of obama care. she said things are changing and she doesn't know why. >>> after six decades of funs and parodies, is "mad" magazine still hooking kids on satire? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." i'm jake tapper. top intelligence official in the country and the director of the nsa are testifying on capitol hill as we speak. when pressed about report the nsa has been tapping the phones of foreign leaders, even allies, director of national intelligence, james clapper said that's long been par for the course plans and intentions of foreign leaders would be important for the united states to know. >> that's a hearty perennial as long as i have b
and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came
the world. this has been making big news abroad. the directors of national intelligence and the nsa will testify on capitol hill today about u.s. surveillance at home and around the world. >> meanwhile, president obama has ordered a review of intelligence gathering outside of the country where as hala says, this has been big news, trying to calm what has become an international diplomatic storm. here's his take. >> that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> let's bring in elyse la by the at the state department. here's the question that not just in the united states but outside of the united states people have. what can you tell us about president obama possibly ordering the nsa to stop spy ong leaders of allied states and did he know this spying was going on when it was indeed happening? >> well, in terms of what he knew and when he knew it, none of us really know. the white house is saying that president obama knew this summer when an internal review that was started revealed that this was happ
that would limit the nsa's ability to gather information. randall pinkston joins us at capitol hill. what happened in those nsa hearings today? >> well, tony, the hearing ended an hour ago after an unusual three and a half hours technique. the members of the house select committee on intelligence complimented the work of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and the content is only available to a handful of people. >> everything that we do on this program is audited 100%. on the business records. 100%. the da data is kept separate frm all the other data we have. it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data period. >> so randall, are these hearings setting the stage for the usa freedom act, and if so what would that legislation mean?
with the latest in the nsa controversy. ambassador to spain, james costas it was called after reports of 60 medical spanish phone calls. >> the european union met behind closed doors. german parliamentians would like to know why they tapped chancellor angela merkel's phone calls. >> we are not considering our chancellor as a terrorist. therefore, i would say they have to think about or to reconsiderk . . . lz >> >> ? >> >>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie here are the top stories. a bipartisan group of lawmakers plans to introduce a bill that could strip the nsa of om of its powers. if passed it ends the agency's ability to bulk collect phone records and restrict who it can spy on. >> fighting in syria blocked u.n. inspectors from access to two chemical weapons facilities, a setback in an attempt to rid syria of chemical weapons. inspectors did not say whether the syrian rebels or the government was responsible for the delay. negotiations for access are under way. >>> abortion right supporters in texas are celebrating a legal victory after a judge found provisions of the aborti
' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizens. calls in the country in the space of a month. >> we need to figure out why this kind of activity is happening and what kind of trust needs to be rebuilt. in the end we're fighting a battle in terms of security and
are the top stories. president obama says his administration is reviewing the nsa policy on spying, after weeks of protests from the european nations about ease droving on world leaders. a european delegation is in washington this week talking about spying reports with u.s. government officials. 26 young men will soon receive a payout totalling $60 million from penn state university. the school is giving this settlement to victims abused by jerry sandusky a little more after a year for 45 counts of child sex abuse. >>> rick perry says a federal ruling will not stop ongoing efforts to protect women. a federal judge has tossed out some abortion restrictions passed by the texas legislature this summer calling them unconstitutional. the new rules were scheduled to take effect tuesday. the state's attorney general is appealing the ruling. >>> those are the headlines at this hour. i am john seigenthaler. "consider this" with antonio moro is next. i will see you here with the news and you can get the latest on aljazeera.com. >>> the white house back pedalling after more nsa backlash. internation
of the nsa and the president's top intelligence chief are both there to testify as anger and suspicion grow over accusations of widespread u.s. spying. the worst of it, tapping the phones of u.s. allies. >> we, all of us in the intelligence community, are very much aware that the recent unauthorized disclosures have raised concerns that you've alluded to, both here in congress and across the nation, about our intelligence activities. we know the public wants to understand how its intelligence community uses its special tools and authorities and to judge whether we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and at the rigorous oversight we've operated under has been effective. >> here are a couple questions. these are the biggies. what did the president know? when did he know it and what specifically depends on who you ask. the senate intelligence committee chaired by diane feinstein, she says, we knew nothing, claiming they were kept in the dark about what the nsa was up to. but other officials say president obama or at least his white house staff knew all abou
need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, journal@c-span.org we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
the "wall street journal report"ed he did learn this summer the nsa was bugging phones of german chancellor angela merkel and other world leaders for nearly five years. followed by a few claims of hhs sebelius obama didn't know about problems of the health care website before the launch. the white house frequently has given a variation on this theme. the question, what did obama know and when did he know it? answer not much and about a minute ago. i mean not much and about a minute ago. and so now we're hearing that from other people that he did know for five years that angela merkel and allies have been -- i mean this is bad. >> the length of time that the program has been under operation or at least the lent of time it has been published with various world leaders. if he did not know, if you choose to believe the president of the united states and i believe the president of the united states, i want to believe the president of the united states. >> some reports suggest he signed off on it. >> if he did not know why didn't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control nation
of the senate intelligence commitee, the democrat, diian feinstein has been a prominent supporter of the nsa, but yesterday, and maybe for the first time, she broke ranks and claimed she is totally opposed to spying on leaders of allies. she also said that the white house told her it would stop the practice. a senior official later said that isn't true, but added the administration is considering the move. katherine herridge is live with us right over here. in europe, they seem all of a sudden to be obsessed with this, hearings and people speaking out. katherine, what else has happened at this hearing? >> well, sheperd, so far really two major headlines from james clapper, the nation's intelligence chief. the first was clearly to make the case that these controversial nsa programs are justified, clapper testified a short time ago that 2500 people were killed by terrorists just this last month, and he used that as a sign that the threat is evolving and growing. let's listen. >> in just this last month, 2,336 people were killed, 1510 injured in pakistan, afghanistan, syria, iraq, and nigeria.
from germany to australia. one report claiming not only was the nsa tapping the private cell phone of the chancellor of germany, angela merkel, ever since 2010, but that president obama knew about it. the nsa hitting back, trashing the report with this statement, saying, general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 this alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel. newsroom reports claiming otherwise are simply not true. germany may be in the spotlight, but that's one of just 30 countries. u.s. allies saying they're furious at the alleged extent of nsa surveillance on their turf. today, the u.s. ambassador to spain was called in for a dressing down by the spanish foreign minister. a spanish newspaper publishing a shocking number, 60. 6-0 million phone calls of average citizens intercepted by the nsa in the past year alone. so joining me now, christiane amanpour, cnn's chief international correspondent and a professor at princeton university. christiane to you, fi
there is a dangerous addiction to the remote warfare. lot nsa has been doing a avoiding putting troops on the ground and it always reminds me but war is so dangerous often it is perceived from cold hearted this and i think the worst american is to minimize the danger in damage that conflict does and one of those is the reliance on remote forms of technology to compensate our willingness to put troops on the ground. one of the only things that stops human beings from fighting is they have had a tough if you outsource to robots to create a precedent we can tell anybody anytime across the planet provided it meets us it could bounce back at some point. >> host: i see that. it a related question is clap conflicts in the past are relevant to the world you forsythe and what countries our best placed because of their experiences that they intend to it will translate to what comes next. with iraq or afghanistan it is hard to realize how good people have got and what they are doing. it is only in the realms of special forces. the capability not only of the ad agencies and a state department is unparalleled in
national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> is a tough time for nsa. we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today, telling you why we defended these programs, then having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance programs. 10:00 a.m.rning at eastern. live sunday on c-span 2. kelly.lls for kitty on c-span 3 "american history tv," each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts. john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out of chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower announced the airport would be named dulles airport. when kennedy took over, he did not want to name that for a crusty old warrior. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles
independent. that's new. thank you. >>> and a new report says nsa is mon tring more. the "washington post" says the agency tapped into cables of data centers around the world. that's according to secret documents from edward snowden. meanwhile they're rejecting allegations that they spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine says that's not true. >>> the boston red sox are world choips. last night they beat st. louis 6-1. here's the scene at fenway park. it's given the city a much needed boost. mark phillips is in the city. good morning, mark. >> what an inning. the crowd in here stood up and got louder weight for the magical moment. the triumph of perseverance. >> the red sox are the world series. >> reporter: bed lamb in boston. thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the world series championship. ite tess first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series. david ortiz was the world series mvp. >> this is for you, boston. you guys deserve it. >> reporter: outside of fenway park groups of fans ran through the str
to either party. people are more independent. that's new. thank you. >>> and a new report says nsa is mon tring more. the "washington post" says the agency tapped into cables of data centers around the world. that's according to secret documents from edward snowden. meanwhile they're rejecting allegations that they spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine says that's not true. >>> the boston red sox are world choips. last night they beat st. louis 6-1. here's the scene at fenway park. it's given the city a much needed boost. mark phillips is in the city. good morning, mark. >> what an inning. the crowd in here stood up and got louder weight for the magical moment. the triumph of perseverance. >> the red sox are the world series. >> reporter: bed lamb in boston. thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the world series championship. ite tess first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series. david ortiz was the world series mvp. >> this is for you, boston. you guys deserve it. >> reporter: outside of fenway park, groups of fans ran thr
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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